Studio61

Amateur Theatre in Wolverhampton

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Welcome to Studio61.org.uk

We are Studio 61, an amateur theatre group based in west Wolverhampton, performing a wide range of drama and we welcome new members and new audiences.

Following our move to The Victory Hall in Lower Penn we are presented with some new challenges and opportunities in our stage sets. We perform a wide variety of drama, favouring ‘black box’ and ‘in the round’ presentation so if you are experienced in, or have a particular interest in, innovative set design and construction we should be excited to hear from you.

Latest News

An announcement to all members and any prospective new members from the director of the February 2015 production:

“Our February 2015 production is “The Weir” by Conor McPherson. We are holding the first two read-throughs on the following dates: Monday 21st July and Friday 8th August at The Victory Hall, Lower Penn, Wolverhampton, WV4 4UP (adjacent to the Greyhound Pub), both events start at 7:30pm.

“The read-throughs will be gender blind, so all attending who wish to read will get the opportunity to do so. Irish accents, both good and bad, will be most welcome, but are not mandatory!

“Especially welcome would be anybody new to the company. Read-throughs are quite informal occasions and provide a great opportunity to get a feel for Studio 61 and to meet and chat with the members.”Kevin Porter

Our November production will be Oh What a Lovely War by Joan Littlewood’s Theatre Workshop, Charles Chilton, Gerry Raffles and Members of the Original Cast.

The cast and crew have been announced and our rehearsals start on 4th July. Take a look at the production page for more information.

We’re very pleased to announce our 2015 season of plays!
The Weir by Conor McPherson
February 2015 – Directed by Kevin Porter
All My Sons by Arthur Miller
June 2015 – Directed by Sarah Carter
The White Devil by John Webster
November 2015 – Directed by Suzanne Smith

2013 in Review

We began 2013 with a February double bill of one act plays, A Man of Letters by Tim Firth and A Respectable Funeral by Jimmie Chinn. A duo of new directors for Studio 61 were found in Ray Manning and Sarah Carter and two small but strong casts told the stories of both sign-mounting, amateur crime writer Frank and three sisters, Joyce, Greta and Evadne, mourning the passing of their mother.

In June we performed the last of Alan Ayckbourn’s “The Norman Conquests” trilogy, Round and Round the Garden. Andy Alsop directed this cast of six in the story of Norman’s misguided attempt at a saucy weekend away with his sister-in-law, as seen from the garden.

And finally, in later November Richard Brinsley Sheridan’s The School for Scandal was dragged out of the 1700s and launched into the 21st Century, helmed by Jane Fosbrook. Gossip spread via BlackBerrys and the potential threat of Lady Teazle’s rumoured philandering airing on Twitter helped bring this classic restoration comedy right up to date.

2014 Productions

Jekyll and Hyde

Jekyll and Hyde by Leonard H. Caddy

Jekyll and Hyde Poster
21st-23rd February
In this retelling of Robert Louis Stevenson’s famous story, Dr. Jekyll is introduced just as he is on the brink of discovering the key to man’s inner reality. One evening he experiments on himself and finds that his formula works. Unfortunately, his “real” self turns out to be the monster Edward Hyde. Jekyll continues his researches, spending more and more time as Hyde until this horrifying character takes over.

Deckchairs 2

Deckchairs 2 by Jean McConnell

Deckchairs 2 Poster
13th-15th June
These four seaside plays with surprising twists feature colourful and animated characters
and delicate observations on life that are sometimes humorous, sometimes touching and
always compassionate.

Oh What A Lovely War

Oh What A Lovely War by Joan Littlewood’s Theatre Workshop, Charles Chilton, Gerry Raffles and Members of the Original Cast

Oh What A Lovely War Poster
19th-23rd November
This musical presentation of the First World War is told through songs and sketches. The original cast took a radio presentation in 1964 and then added their own material. They told the tragic story of the war mainly from the point of view of the men who fought in it. Their sacrifice is brought to the fore as we share their life in the trenches and battlefields. The show received critical acclaim and has been performed in many ways since then. The themes of hardship and the futility of war are still relevant today. The original show used multi media slides and visual media that was ahead of its time in the 1960′s. Studio 61 will make full use of the multi media aspects of the show using the technology available today.