Production Archive

Arcadia by Tom Stoppard

Arcadia  Poster

Arcadia

Written by Tom Stoppard

Directed by Jane Fosbrook

The Victory Hall, Lower Penn, WV4 4UN

This wonderfully witty play by one of our greatest living playwrights transports us between events in a grand country house in 1809 and the present day when two writers struggle to interpret these events using what evidence they can find, each hoping to further their own academic credibility. Everything is here, from sheer farce to intellectual debate. Throw into the mix a motley assortment of brilliantly drawn characters, a tortoise, Fermat’s last theorem, a hermit and the history of landscaping and we have an absorbing, challenging and entertaining play. Best to keep a clear head and save that drink at The Greyhound until after the show!

There will be play readings/auditions for this production on the following dates:

If you are interested in being involved but cannot make those dates please email the director (Jane – janehfos@aol.com) to let her know and she can sort something out.

Cast and Creative

Directed by Jane Fosbrook

The Kitchen Sink by Tom Wells

The Kitchen Sink Poster

The Kitchen Sink

Written by Tom Wells

Directed by Sarah Carter

The Victory Hall, Lower Penn, WV4 4UN

Amid the dreaming, the dramas and the dirty dishes, something has to give. But will it be Kath or the kitchen sink?
Things aren’t going to plan for one family in Withernsea. Pieces are falling off Martin’s milk float as quickly as he’s losing customers and something’s up with Kath’s kitchen sink. Billy is pinning his hopes of a place at art college on a revealing portrait of Dolly Parton, whilst Sophie’s dreams of becoming a ju-jitsu teacher might be disappearing down the plughole.

Cast and Creative

Directed by Sarah Carter

Martin
Ian Hartley
Kath
Mel Hartley
Sophie
Roisin Buxton
Billy
Steph Haynes
Pete
Andrew Watt
Prompt
Suzanne Smith
Stage Manager
Rachael Stevens
Properties
Maggie Smith
Costume
Chris Porter
Set Construction
Ian Howarth
Effects Manager
Martin Smith
Front of House Manager
Mike Smith
Promotions and Publicity
Terri Perks

The Lover and The Dumb Waiter by Harold Pinter

The Lover and The Dumb Waiter

The Lover and The Dumb Waiter

Written by Harold Pinter

Directed by Suzanne Smith

The Victory Hall, Lower Penn, WV4 4UN

In The Dumb Waiter, Gus and Ben are on the job, waiting and listening. Into the waiting silence rattles the dumb waiter with extraordinary demands for dishes they cannot supply – and who is operating the dumb waiter in an empty house? In a while their instructions will come and they will know what to do.

In The Lover, married couple Richard and Sarah both have lovers. They indulge in erotic wish fulfilment and thus keep the marriage refreshed. Then Richard begins to upset the status quo by refusing to allow the distinct halves of their relationship to remain separate. Sarah’s afternoons have been for Max, the evenings for Richard. This evening, Max encroaches on Richard’s preserves.

Tickets are £8 including refreshments. Get your tickets by ringing the box office on 01902 651828.

Cast and Creative

Directed by Suzanne Smith

Richard
Glenn Morris
Sarah
Sarah Carter
John
Mike Davenport
Ben
Mike Smith
Gus
Kevin Porter

Habeas Corpus by Alan Bennett

The Habeas Corpus Poster

Habeas Corpus

Written by Alan Bennett

Directed by Sue Hay

The Victory Hall, Lower Penn, WV4 4UN

The antics at the Wicksteed home are a satirical merry-go-round. Family, friends and the sexual satisfaction of the “corpus” (body) are the ruling passions in this farcical comedy of ill-manners. Through a dance of mistaken identities and carnal encounters, one motto holds fast: “He whose lust lasts, lasts longest.”

Cast and Creative

Directed by Sue Hay

Arthur Wicksteed
Peter Carrington-Porter
Muriel Wicksteed
Jane Alsop
Dennis Wicksteed
Ben Savage
Constance Wicksteed
Suzanne Smith
Mrs Swabb
Patricia Boyd
Canon Throbbing
Mike Smith
Lady Rumpers
Jane Fosbrook
Felicity Rumpers
Sarah Carter
Mr Shanks
David Bickley
Sir Percy Shorter
Andy Alsop
Mr Purdue
Mike Davenport

Rules of Assortment and Frisky & the Panda Man by Ross Howard

The Rules of Assortment and Frisky & the Panda Man Poster

Rules of Assortment and Frisky & the Panda Man

Written by Ross Howard

Directed by Sarah Carter

Newhampton Arts Centre, Dunkley Street, Wolverhampton, West Midlands, WV1 4AN

In Rules of Assortment, Mike’s job at the Royal Providential Co-operative Bank looks to be on precarious ground until he advises his boss to rethink the allocation of jelly beans to each department.

In Frisky & the Panda Man, animal conservationist Dr. Ogden has spent most of his life pandering to pandas. But lately they’ve been dropping like flies and now there’s just one panda left. Her name is Frisky and really she’s been nothing of the sort…

These plays were performed in conjunction with a performance of “Bed Among the Lentils” by Alan Bennett performed by our friends at Pattingham Drama Group.

Cast and Creative

Directed by Sarah Carter

Hannah
Jessica Baxter
Angela
Lucy Hayreh
Mike
Ben Savage
Dr Ogden
Mike Smith
Frisky
Steph Haynes
Interviewer
Becky Gitsham
RoA Stage Manager
Becky Gitsham
RoA Set Manager
Steph Haynes
RoA Effects Manager
Mike Smith
F&tPM Stage Manager
Jessica Baxter
F&tPM Set Manager
Ben Savage
F&tPM Effects Manager
Lucy Hayreh

Neighbourhood Watch by Alan Ayckbourn

The Neighbourhood WatchPoster

Neighbourhood Watch

Written by Alan Ayckbourn

Directed by Jane Fosbrook

The Victory Hall, Lower Penn, WV4 4UN

If you’ve never been to a local amateur show before then this is a great way to start, and if you have been, then you will know that Ayckbourn (and Studio 61!) never disappoints.

Alan Ayckbourn is the master of turning the ordinary into the extraordinary by his keen ability to bring out the humour of everyday life, leaving us aching with laughter and squirming with embarrassment at his characters’ antics.

In this play we follow brother and sister Martin and Hilda, as they join with a motley crew of new neighbours to set up a Neighbourhood Watch group around their new home. What starts as merely a security-conscious exercise soon escalates into a quasi-military movement, fuelled by misunderstandings, paranoia, eccentric characters and developing relationships. The essentially comic nature of the play is, as always with Ayckbourn, tempered with moments of poignancy and insights into our current society, which results in a very rich evening of entertainment.

Oh, and then there’s the gnome…

The cast of Neighbourhood Watch

Cast and Creative

Directed by Jane Fosbrook

Martin Massie
Ian Howarth
Hilda Massie
Maggie Smith
Luther Bradley
Ben Savage
Magda Bradley
Sarah Carter
Gareth Janner
Glenn Morris
Amy Janner
Becky Gitsham
Rod Trusser
Kevin Porter
Dorothy Doggett
Patricia Boyd

Bombshells by Joanna Murray-Smith

The Bombshells Poster

Bombshells

Written by Joanna Murray-Smith

Directed by Martin Smith

The Victory Hall, Lower Penn, WV4 4UN

Five monologues exposing five women balancing their inner and outer lives with humour and often desperate cunning.

Meryl: That’s hubbie Barry off to work, so now there’s Amy and Ben to get to school. Plus a myriad of other responsibilities. And don’t forget baby! Just where are those socks?

Tiggy: Giving a society lecture can be a nerve-wracking experience. Tiggy will tell you all you ever wanted to know about cacti. But is it succulents that are foremost in her mind?

Mary: Nobody can sing and dance like Mary. She has the voice, she has the moves and she’s primed, ready to crush Angela McTerry in the Talent Show. What could possibly go wrong?

Theresa: Finally the big day has arrived! Theresa is marrying Ted, the man of her dreams. As she climbs into the beautiful dress, she relishes the years of unadulterated bliss that lie ahead…

Winsome: Widowhood has put no breaks on Winsome’s social life. She joins in all the group activities. And she does volunteer work for the Blind Society. Has life got one last surprise for her?

Director’s Notes

Since becoming hooked on the theatrical experience which is “The Edinburgh Fringe”, I have come to love the intimate atmosphere afforded by small, black-curtain lined rooms where audience and cast are only metres apart. While not exactly a buzzing venue on the Royal Mile, our venue here at the Victory Hall does provide something of that experience.

The ultimate intimate theatre comprises one actor who is able to capture the audience’s attention with their characterisation and story telling. In Bombshells you will see a well-written series of “one-woman” shows telling very different stories which are in turn both funny and sad. Each actor must draw you, the audience, into her character’s world and give you at least a glimpse of that character’s soul. To do this in a piece which is only ten to twenty minutes long is, to say the least, a very real challenge.

By way of a minor warning to those of you who are offended by bad language, Bombshells does contain some! I don’t feel it is gratuitous and we didn’t at any stage in rehearsals find ourselves searching for alternative ways to express certain feelings.

For me, when watching actors on stage I always come back to the same question: do I believe you? Enjoy the show today and hopefully you’ll agree with me (and with the character of Theresa!) and say “I do”.

Cast and Creative

Directed by Martin Smith

Meryl Louise Davenport
Lucy Hayreh
Tiggy Entwhistle
Maggie Smith
Mary O’Donnell
Sarah Carter
Theresa McTerry
Suzanne Smith
Winsome Webster
Jane Fosbrook
Properties
Anna Wright
Prompt
Ann Bickley
Lighting and Sound
Martin Smith

Gallery

The White Devil by John Webster

The White Devil Poster

The White Devil

Written by John Webster

Directed by Suzanne Smith

The Victory Hall, Lower Penn, WV4 4UN

Duke Brachiano is besotted with the beautiful Vittoria Comrombona. The feeling is mutual. Just two obstacles stand in their way. His wife and her husband. Brachiano enlists the help of Vittoria’s brother, Flamineo, to fool her husband, and the illicit affair begins. But their infidelity does not go unnoticed. Their spouses have powerful friends who exact tenacious revenge. Accusations of adultery and murder fly and Vittoria and Flamineo find themselves snared in a web of corruption, passion and retribution as their single minded pursuit of personal gain reaches at epic and bloody conclusion.

One of the great works of Jacobean theatre, The White Devil was written 4 years before Shakespeare’s death. The play exhibits evocative imagery as Webster explores the violence of passion, the anguish of betrayal and the primitive instincts that lie beneath a civilised veneer.

Director’s Notes

It has been many years since I first saw “The White Devil” and I still, to this day, remember my feelings of excitement, shock and more than a little confusion. Not as well known as Shakespeare it can be difficult to get your head around. Nevertheless, it is with great pleasure I present my vision of arguably the greatest Jacobean revenge tragedy of them all.

With mercenary servants, corrupt priests, adulterers and murderers, and almost everyone out for their own ends, there is little to recommend any of them to heaven. We can be happy in the knowledge that people do get their just deserts!

It has been a pleasure to direct this talented cast who have met every challenge of this very difficult play with enthusiasm, inventiveness and fun. It has been a ball! I hope you all enjoy watching as much as I have enjoyed producing it.

Cast and Creative

Directed by Suzanne Smith

Monticelso
Kevin Porter
Francisco de Medici
Mike Smith
The Duke of Brachiano
Ian Hartley
Count Lodovico
Peter Carrington-Porter
Camillo
Andy Alsop
Antonelli
Mike Davenport
Gasparo
David Bickley
Hortensio
Ken Towlson
Flamineo
Steph Haynes
Marcello
Casper Drake
Isabella
Jane Fosbrook
Vittoria Corombona
Sarah Carter
Cornelia
Patricia Boyd
Zanche
Sue Hay
Matron
Ann Bickley
Servant
Suzanne Smith
Stage Manager
Maggie Smith
Properties
Anna Wright
Costume
Suzanne Smith
Lighting and Sound
Martin Smith
Lighting and Sound Assistant
Peter Terry-Short
Poster Photography
Mental Images
Video Filming and Editing
Wolverhampton Film Makers
Front of House
Rita Dudek
Front of House
Joan Worrall
Front of House
Ian Howarth
Car Park
Ben Dudek

But Yesterday by Jimmie Chinn

But Yesterday Poster

But Yesterday

Written by Jimmie Chinn

Directed by Jane Fosbrook

Newhampton Arts Centre, Dunkley Street, Wolverhampton, West Midlands, WV1 4AN

This atmospheric, enigmatic play, set in the 1950s and before, concerns the return of a young man, Robert, to his family home. What are his family secrets and how have they affected the drastic course which his life is about to take…?

The play will be performed on Friday 24th July at Newhampton Arts Centre as part of their inaugural Amateur and Community Theatre festival. Pattingham Drama group will be performing Deckchairs on the same programme, to be followed by a question and answer session.

Cast and Creative

Directed by Jane Fosbrook

Robert
Ian Howarth
Howard
Andy Alsop
Chloe
Patricia Boyd
Ruth
Maggie Smith
The Woman
Steph Haynes
Man
Kevin Porter
Lighting and Sound
Martin Smith
Properties
Anna Wright
Prompt
Sarah Carter

All My Sons by Arthur Miller

All My Sons Poster

All My Sons

Written by Arthur Miller

Directed by Sarah Carter

The Victory Hall, Lower Penn, WV4 4UN

The story concerns the fortunes of the Keller and Deever families. During the war, Joe Keller and Steve Deever ran a machine shop which made aeroplane parts. Deever was sent to prison because the firm turned out defective parts, causing the deaths of many men. Keller, however, went free and made a lot of money. The twin shadows of this catastrophe and the fact that the young Keller son was reported missing during the war dominate the action.

Director’s Notes

When Arthur Miller started writing All My Sons in 1941 it was his last-ditch effort to succeed after his previous play, The Man Who Had All The Luck, closed after four performances and disastrous reviews. When it finally came to Broadway in 1947 it was both critically and commercially well received and earned him his first Tony Award for Best Author establishing his reputation as a successful playwright.

Like many of Miller’s plays, All My Sons is based upon a true story that Miller’s mother-in-law pointed out to him in an Ohio newspaper. The news story regarded the Wright Aeronautical Corporation who shipped and installed a significant number of engines that did not meet Army Air Forces inspection standards. It resulted in three army officers being convicted of neglect of duty.

It also draws a great amount of influence from Henrik Ibsen’s work – a single location over a short amount of time where information about the characters’ past is slowly drip-fed to the audience during the course of the entire play. In particular it reflects the themes in Ibsen’s The Wild Duck in which one member of a business partnership is forced to take moral and legal responsibility for the other.

I have been a great fan of Miller’s plays ever since studying A View From The Bridge (my personal favourite of his) during my GCSEs. The fastidiousness of his stage directions is very appealing to me – Miller knows what he wants to convey at every moment throughout the play and he wants to make sure that anybody producing it does too. Just like his other well-known plays such as The Crucible or Death of a Salesman, he presents us with a leading man who whilst incredibly flawed is also highly relatable and leads us to question our natural compassion towards him. Keller isn’t evil – he just has a tragic lack of vision.

This production marks the end of my third year with Studio 61, but it feels like I’ve been part of this little family for much longer. I am very lucky to work with so much talent both on stage and behind the scenes – directing this production has been a dream. I’d like to give a big thank you to everybody in the cast, working backstage and on front of house for the hard work and dedication they have shown in getting the production to where it is now. I would also like to extend this thanks to you as our audience and patrons. Without your support we wouldn’t be able to indulge our theatrical impulses and have the opportunity to look at such interesting and diverse plays.

Cast and Creative

Directed by Sarah Carter

Joe Keller
Peter Carrington-Porter
Kate “Mother” Keller
Jane Alsop
Chris Keller
Ben Savage
Ann Deever
Becky Gitsham
George Deever
Chris Handley
Jim Bayliss
Mike Smith
Sue Bayliss
Maggie Smith
Frank Lubey
Glenn Morris
Lydia Lubey
Lucy Hayreh
Bert
Finn Hayreh
Assistant Director
Mike Davenport
Stage Manager
Suzanne Smith
Assistant Stage Manager
Anna Wright
Prompt
Kevin Porter
Properties
Sue Hay
Costume
Elizabeth Thompson
Costume
Sue Carrington-Porter
Set Design
Jane O’Reilly
Set Construction
Ian Howarth
Set Construction
Members of the Company
Effects Manager
Martin Smith
Effects Assistant
Peter Terry-Short
Front of House
Rita Dudek
Front of House
Joan Worrall
Front of House
Jane Fosbrook
Front of House
Ann Bickley
Front of House
Steph Haynes
Car Park Attendant
Ben Dudek
Car Park Attendant
David Bickley

Gallery

The Weir by Conor McPherson

The Weir Poster

The Weir

Written by Conor McPherson

Directed by Kevin Porter

The Victory Hall, Lower Penn, WV4 4UN

The Greyhound Pub, Lower Penn, WV4 4UN

“There’s no dark like a winter night in the country. And there was a wind like this one tonight, howling and whistling in off the sea.”

When you are a visitor to the wild, isolated shores of the west coast of Ireland what other entertainment is there to be had of an evening other than to join with the locals in Brendan’s bar?

You’ll receive a warm Gaelic welcome. Take a pint of dark stout and Brendan’ll not only be sure to inquire if you’ll be wanting a small one to go with it, but also consider joining you in a glass of Irish whiskey himself. Aside from a cheering tot of alcohol to keep out the chill, you’ll have come for the craic. Brendan, Jack, Jim, Finbar and Valerie, a mysterious newcomer to the area from Dublin, will not disappoint.

But beware, they have stories to tell that might disturb your night’s sleep, for as the evening progresses and darkness falls around the pub the past will close in to haunt the present.
Studio 61 presents Conor McPherson’s award-winning modern classic play “The Weir”.

Pull up a chair. Make yourself comfortable. And be sure to keep your loved ones close by. You may be thankful for their company.

Director’s Notes

At Studio 61 we are always keen to take on new challenges in order to bring our audiences a broad range of theatrical delights. We were gratified by the positive feedback we got from those who attended one or other of our performances of ‘Oh What a Lovely War’.

‘The Weir’ could hardly be in greater contrast to Joan Littlewood’s ensemble workshop piece. It is a modern play containing strong language, but it is a play that is poignant, tender, not short of humour and, we hope, as affecting in its own way as our last production.

Conor McPherson wrote ‘The Weir’ in 1997 and it was first produced at the Royal Court Theatre in London. It has been called a modern masterpiece and won the Laurence Olivier Award for the Best New Play of the Year.

When five people gather in an isolated bar in the north-west of Ireland, the talk drifts to tales of fairies and uncanny experiences. We begin to understand that these people are adrift; that loss, loneliness and chance, assuming the metaphorical garb of the supernatural in the play, have all been close at hand to affect the direction they have taken in their lives, leaving them all with regret.

Gradually the five are brought into an ever closer intimacy as the stories are told. By the end of the evening two of the characters are drawn into sharing deeply personal revelations about their own lives and, we imagine, in doing so open themselves to the beginning of a healing process. We learn perhaps that the power that regret has to haunt every minute of our lives is best ameliorated by disclosure, whether to God or just to each other.

In the end ‘The Weir’ teaches us that the least we can do is to listen carefully to each other with compassion and it reminds us that we should reach out especially to those who have no one to listen to them.

Cast and Creative

Directed by Kevin Porter

Jack
David Kinghorn
Brendan
Ben Savage
Jim
Glenn Morris
Finbar
Andy Alsop
Valerie
Sue Hay
Co-Director
Suzanne Smith
Stage Manager
Maggie Smith
Properties
Jane Fosbrook
Lighting and Sound
Sarah Carter
Lighting and Sound
Martin Smith
Set Manager
Ian Howarth
Prompt
Ann Bickley
Violinist
Jane O’Reilly
Front of House
Rita Dudek
Refreshments
Rita Dudek
Refreshments
Members of the Society

Gallery

Oh What a Lovely War by Joan Littlewood’s Theatre Workshop, Charles Chilton, Gerry Raffles and Members of the Original Cast

Oh What a Lovely War Poster

Oh What a Lovely War

Written by Joan Littlewood’s Theatre Workshop, Charles Chilton, Gerry Raffles and Members of the Original Cast

Directed by Ian Howarth

The Victory Hall, Lower Penn, WV4 4UN

This musical presentation of the First World War is told through songs and sketches. The original cast took a radio presentation in 1964 and then added their own material. They told the tragic story of the war mainly from the point of view of the men who fought in it. Their sacrifice is brought to the fore as we share their life in the trenches and battlefields. The show received critical acclaim and has been performed in many ways since then. The themes of hardship and the futility of war are still relevant today. The original show used multi media slides and visual media that was ahead of its time in the 1960’s. Studio 61 will make full use of the multi media aspects of the show using the technology available today.

Director’s Notes

Oh What a Lovely War, first billed as a “Musical Entertainment” tells the story of the First World War from the point of view of the ordinary soldier. Joan Littlewood’s original Theatre Workshop improvised many of the scenes. Her production broke the mould for British theatre by using improvisation and by deliberately breaking the barrier between actors and audience. The original performances took place at the Theatre Royal Stratford East. I felt privileged to see a revival production of the same show earlier this year. As soon as I walked into that theatre I felt the intimacy of that wonderful little theatre and wanted to capture that same intimacy here in Victory Hall. I have never heard of any other company performing this piece in the round and I loved the challenge of adapting it for your entertainment. Amongst the displays in the foyer you will find a copy of the original programme from the 1963 original production.

Cast and Creative

Directed by Ian Howarth

Pierrot
Andy Alsop
Pierrot
Jane Alsop
Pierrot
Ann Bickley
Pierrot
David Bickley
Pierrot
Sarah Carter
Pierrot
Peter Carrington-Porter
Pierrot
Mike Davenport
Pierrot
Jane Fosbrook
Pierrot
Max Goode
Pierrot
Sue Hay
Pierrot
Lucy Hayreh
Pierrot
Kevin Porter
Pierrot
Mike Smith
Pierrot
Ken Towlson
Singing Support
Ron Beardsmore
Singing Support
Leuan Parry Jones
Stage Manager
Maggie Smith
Sound and Lighting
Martin Smith
Keyboard and Musical Arrangements
Martin Fox
Hymn Arrangements
Leek Operatic
Properties
Suzanne Smith
Prompt
Patricia Boyd
Costumes
Lichfield Costume Hire
Set Design
Ian Howarth
Front of House
Rita Dudek
Front of House
Joan Worral
Refreshments
Liz Beardsmore
Refreshments
Rita Parry

Deckchairs II by Jean McConnell

Deckchairs II Poster

Deckchairs II

Written by Jean McConnell

Directed by Martin Smith

The Victory Hall, Lower Penn, WV4 4UN

These four seaside plays with surprising twists feature colourful and animated characters and delicate observations on life that are sometimes humorous, sometimes touching and always compassionate.

In Day Trippers, two co-workers, one confident and one prudish, learn more about themselves and their colleagues than they ought to while sitting on a secluded beach during the annual works outing to the seaside.

Short Changed finds a retired headmistress, who wants to move to a residential home, facing a social services official who wants to know much more about her past.

The Guilt Card concerns a woman whose life is blighted by the machinations and emotional blackmail of her sickly elder sister.

Theatrical Digs is a farcical battle of wits, work, agents and mobile phones between a glamorous, conceited actress and an eccentric older performer.

Cast and Creative

Directed by Martin Smith

Beryl
Jane Fosbrook
Doris
Maggie Smith
Miss Westlake
Patricia Boyd
Julia Griffith
Lucy Hayreh
Deborah
Suzanne Smith
Marion
Sarah Carter
Maggie Festoon
Patricia Boyd
Pascaline Holbein
Sue Hay
Assistant Director
Kevin Porter

Gallery

Jekyll and Hyde by Leonard H. Caddy

Jekyll and Hyde Poster

Jekyll and Hyde

Written by Leonard H. Caddy

Directed by Maggie Smith

The Victory Hall, Lower Penn, WV4 4UN

In this retelling of Robert Louis Stevenson’s famous story, Dr. Jekyll is introduced just as he is on the brink of discovering the key to man’s inner reality. One evening he experiments on himself and finds that his formula works. Unfortunately, his “real” self turns out to be the monster Edward Hyde. Jekyll continues his researches, spending more and more time as Hyde until this horrifying character takes over.

Director’s Notes

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde was published in 1886 and was instrumental in launching the author, Robert Louis Stevenson, to literary fame. The novel, a mystery thriller about a respectable man who takes a potion to occasionally become a dark and evil character, was written as a “shilling shocker.” Popular during the Victorian era (the mid-1800s to about 1900), shilling shockers were short, graphic, and inexpensive books eagerly consumed by the masses. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde has been in continual publication for over 120 years. There are many theories about the themes of this book, “good versus evil”, ”lies and deceit”, “science” and so it goes on. If you are an a great fan of this classic you may not like some of the liberties taken with this play. There is a love interest (of a sort) for Dr Jekyll which of course doesn’t happen in the book, in fact there are very few instances where women are mentioned in the book. The playwright has put in some interesting female characters and apart from the “love interest” the other women could easily have been in the background.

As always it is fun to do a radio play, no line learning, sound effects. Trying to find a “character” is more difficult than it seems. We are used to be told what our character is like from the script, making one up to be convincing is not easy. We hope you enjoy the ‘radio play’ as much as we have during rehearsals.

Cast and Creative

Directed by Maggie Smith

Narrator
Andy Alsop
Utterson
Andy Alsop
Jekyll
Mike Smith
Celestine
Jane Fosbrook
Charlotte
Becky Gitsham
Lanyon
Mike Davenport
Poole
David Bickley
Hilda
Suzanne Smith
Penny
Patricia Boyd
Hyde
Kevin Porter
Recorded Sound
Martin Smith
Sound Effects
Ann Bickley
Sound Effects
Sarah Carter
Sound Effects
Glenn Morris
Front of House
Rita Dudek
Front of House
Ben Dudek
Front of House
Joan Ward
Front of House
Peter Worrall
Front of House
Ian Howarth
Refreshments
Sue Ridley
Refreshments
Viv Bunce
Refreshments
Members of the Society

Gallery

The School for Scandal by Richard Brinsley Sheridan

The School for Scandal Poster

The School for Scandal

Written by Richard Brinsley Sheridan

Directed by Jane Fosbrook

The Victory Hall, Lower Penn, WV4 4UN

Lady Sneerwell wants to marry Charles Surface, while Joseph Surface wants to marry Maria, an heiress and ward of Sir Peter Teazle. Maria, however, prefers Charles over Joseph. In order to detach her from Charles, Lady Sneerwell and Joseph spread rumours about an affair between Charles and Lady Teazle, Sir Peter’s new young wife. Meanwhile, Sir Oliver Surface, newly returned from the East Indies, assumes various disguises to test his nephews’ characters.

Director’s Notes

School for Scandal, by Richard Brindsley Sheridan, was first performed in 1777, and was hailed as a comic masterpiece, reflecting the social mores of the time. The aspiring London classes, anxious to maintain their fashionable status, were plagued by gossip which spread like wildfire. Reputations see-sawed and those struggling to keep up appearances relied on loans from unscrupulous moneylenders…

Um, was that 1777 or 2013? It was the resonances with today’s social networking that made me want to direct this play and for this reason it will be set in the present day, Twitter and all. In any case, there is just not space backstage for all those wigs and crinolines! With a large cast and some new faces this should be an enjoyable and rewarding production for both cast and audience.

Cast and Creative

Directed by Jane Fosbrook

Prologue
Maggie Smith
Lady Sneerwell
Jane Alsop
Her Servant
Ann Bickley
Snake
Danny Hitchins
Joseph Surface
Robert Mottram Jones
Maria
Suzanne Smith
Mrs Candour
Patricia Boyd
Crabtree
Ray Manning
Sir Benjamin Backbite
Ben Savage
Sir Peter Teazle
Peter Carrington-Porter
Rowley
Mike Smith
Lady Teazle
Debby Turpin
Sir Oliver Surface
Andy Alsop
Trip
Ken Towlson
Moses
Mike Davenport
Charles Surface
Ian Howarth
Careless
Kevin Porter
First Gentleman
Glenn Morris
Second Gentleman
Josh Kinghorn
Sir Harry Bumper
David Kinghorn
Jospeh’s Servant
David Bickley
Assistant Director
Sarah Porter
Stage Manager
Waheda Khanam
Sound and Lightning
Martin Smith
Set
Martin Smith
Set
Suzanne Smith
Set
Sue Carrington-Porter
Set Advisor
Cheryl Wilson
Properties
Maggie Smith
Costume
Elizabeth Thompson
Music
David and Josh Kinghorn
Prompt
Vi Bayliss
Box Office
Joan Worrall
Front of House
Rita Dudek
Front of House
Members of the Society
Refreshments
Sue Ridley
Refreshments
Members of the Society
Programme and Flyer
Sarah Porter

Gallery

Round and Round the Garden by Alan Ayckbourn

Round and Round the Garden Poster

Round and Round the Garden

Written by Alan Ayckbourn

Directed by Andy Alsop

The Victory Hall, Lower Penn, WV4 4UN

The events of one weekend as seen from the garden. Sarah tries to have a nice civilized weekend. Norman tries to make everyone happy. Ruth confuses Tom. Annie gets a glimpse of Norman’s pyjamas. Norman tells Sarah stories by moonlight. Sarah disapproves of Reg’s outdoor sports …and everyone gets to roll in the grass.

With his wit and compassion, Alan Ayckbourn reveals the frustration which bubbles beneath the surface of a family’s relationships bringing to light their thoughts on life, love and loneliness.

Join us in Annie’s garden for this, the third play of Ayckbourn’s trilogy The Norman Conquests and be prepared to laugh through this hilarious and poignant comedy.

Cast and Creative

Directed by Andy Alsop

Norman
Ray Manning
Tom
Ben Savage
Sarah
Maggie Smith
Annie
Sarah Porter
Reg
Ian Howarth
Ruth
Morgan Davies
Assistant Director
Peter Carrington-Porter
Lighting and Sound
Martin Smith
Set and Props
Jane Fosbrook
Stage Manager
Waheda Khanam
Continuity
Patricia Boyd
Front of House
Sue Ridley
Front of House
Members of the Society
Refreshments
Joan Worrall
Refreshments
Members of the Society
Car Parking
Members of the Society

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A Man of Letters by Tim Firth and A Respectable Funeral by Jimmie Chinn

A Man of Letters and A Respectable Funeral Poster

A Man of Letters

Written by Tim Firth

Directed by Sarah Porter

A Respectable Funeral

Written by Jimmie Chinn

Directed by Ray Manning

The Victory Hall, Lower Penn, WV4 4UN

A Man of Letters involves Frank, a well-worn northerner, with aspirations to write spy thrillers – this plots of which he acts out when he is alone – who has erected signs for a commercial letterer for twenty-five years. On a ledge of his boss’s building, assisted by trainee Alan, he attempts to spell out the company name “Forshaw” but as dusk threatens, things do not go to plan.

A Respectable Funeral is a clever and funny observation of three sisters whose old animosities emerge when they return to their mother’s house after her funeral. Then, with a little help from the obligatory post-funeral tipple, family secrets start coming to light.

Cast and Creative

Directed by Sarah Porter and Ray Manning

Frank
Andy Alsop
Alan
Ben Savage
Joyce
Liz Greene
Greta
Jane Alsop
Evadne
Jane Fosbrook
Charlie
Peter Carrington-Porter
Stage Manager
Maggie Smith
Assistant Stage Manager
David Bickley
Assistant Stage Manager
Robert Mottram-Jones
Sound and Lighting
Martin Smith
Prompt
Mike Davenport
Prompt
Vi Bayliss
Set Painting
Members of the society
Front of House
Rita Dudek
Front of House
Members of the Society
Refreshments
Sue Ridley
Refreshments
Members of the Society
Box Office
Joan Worrall
Publicity
Suzanne Smith

Albert Make Us Laugh by Jimmie Chinn

The Albert Make Us Laugh Poster

Albert Make Us Laugh

Written by Jimmie Chinn

Directed by Martin Smith

The Victory Hall, Lower Penn, WV4 4UN

Albert Nutall, aged seven – some would say he is backward, and, at first glance you’d agree – but Albert is special. He is a poet and a visionary who, as he grows to manhood, inspires unexpected depths of emotion in other people, notably his classmate Primrose, whose glorious future as an actress fails to materialise, and the lost and lonely young schoolteacher, Janet Partington.

Director’s Notes

“Albert Make Us Laugh” is certainly a funny play but simply to describe it as a comedy rather misses the point. Based on the playwright’s own boyhood experiences, the play delicately touches on the subjects of poverty, incest, bullying, despair, hope and love. The characters include several children (initially aged eleven) but the play is specifically written for all of the parts to be played by adults. The period is the late 1940s (and then ten years on), the location is London and the two settings are Belmont Fields Secondary Modern School and Albert’s home. The staging is deliberately simple to allow a rapid flow from scene to scene.

Cast and Creative

Directed by Martin Smith

Headmaster Tope
Peter Carrington-Porter
Enid Nuttall
Maggie Smith
The Caretaker
Andy Alsop
Miss Mint
Jane Alsop
Miss Hemsley
Debby Turpin
Miss Partington
Sarah Porter
Mr Leatherbottle
Mike Davenport
Eric Smallshaw
Ben Savage
Albert Nutall
Ray Manning
Primrose Macaveney
Jane Fosbrook
Lobelia Bottomly
Ann Bickley
A Little Girl
Sue Ridley
Barbara Batch
Kate Lawrence
Shane Butterworth
Ken Towlson
Charlie Shorrocks
Dean Purcell
Stage Manager
Andy Alsop
Assistant Stage Manager
David Bickley
Lighting and Sound
Martin Smith
Wardrobe
Heather Campbell
Wardrobe
Elizabeth Thompson
Properties
David Bickley
Prompt
Vi Bayliss
Set Painting
Members of the Society
Refreshments
Sue Ridley
Refreshments
Viv Bunce
Front of House
Ian Howarth
Front of House
Mike Smith
Front of House
Members of the Society
Box Office
Joan Worrall

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Some People Think I’m Odd by Mike Fosbrook

The Some People Think I'm Odd Poster

Some People Think I’m Odd

Written by Mike Fosbrook

The Vault, Edinburgh Fringe

Pandora likes knives. She likes cutting things. But her obsession has led to a shocking, irreversible act. Now she is safe. Pandora tells her story – dark, disturbing, sometimes funny – but is it the truth?

Cast and Creative

Pandora
Jane Frost

Reviews

“Frost’s portrayal of Pandora is excellent.”The Scotsman

“Jane Frost is a strong solo performer, switching between mother, child and a squeaky psycho Mr Punch.”Three Weeks

“Jane Frost is compelling as Pandora.”The List

“Our remembrance of Punch’s cruelty adds an extra dimension and leaves one definitely thinking, “That’s the way to do it”.”British Theatre Guide

“Frost’s Pandora is uncomfortably convincing.”Wolverhampton Express and Star

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The production archive is still being developed…

We’re currently in the process of re-developing our production archive. Here is a list of more of our productions: